What we believe… and why

deer montageTaste the Wild courses focus on three different issues: sustainability, seasonality and locality. The core of our business is teaching people about wild food foraging. Our courses are run often from the same locations and so we collect wild edible plants from these same places throughout the season. As we teach and forage from these wild places year after year we teach people to look after the environment. We want them to understand the ecosystem that relies on the plants from which we are harvesting and only collect a proportion of what is there.brimstone montageSustainable foraging is what we teach and what we passionately believe in. Our Wild Food Aquagarden would be the ultimate way to supply larger quantities of wild salads and herbs, but it would never replace the joy of collecting a few wild treats from nature’s larder. If you agree with our philosophy have a look at our new project The Wild Food Aquagarden and see if you can support us.https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/994301377/the-wild-food-aquagarden

I just walked along the river bank before writing this and saw Hogweed buds starting to form, excellent Ground Elder growing and Common Sorrel that was 12cm long! I love to keep in touch with the plants and the land, things change almost daily at this time of year and it feeds my soul.dandylion montageBesides teaching we also manage Taste the Wild’s eighteen acres of woodland for biodiversity, creating a range of habitats and managing them for both animal and plant life. The woods have become a haven for wildlife such as Buzzards, woodpeckers and deer in an area of predominantly intensive arable farming. We have an area of young conifer species which we are gradually thinning to help the natural regeneration of Birches, willows and oaks. We have created ponds and glades for insects and amphibians and along the rides we are planting smaller native broadleaf species for nuts, berries and fruit. These species give wild food to the birds, insects and mammals of the wood as well as us. We have a growing diversity of flora and fauna as shown by our species list which gets longer every year. Our facilities are basic to keep our carbon foot print as small as possible: cooking is on a wood fire (wood produced from our trees), we have composting toilets and our waste water is filtered through lava stones and sand.http://www.tastethewild.co.uk/community.html

 

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