Laverbread Tortellini

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I love Laver seaweed!!  My lovely wife Rose does not. I am trying to convert her and recently tried this recipe out on one of our Coastal Foraging course in Staithes. It went down really well , it even got pronounced “best tortellini ever” by some. Unfortunately I am still trying to convince Rose.

The stuffing for the tortellini is inspired by a traditional South Wales laverbread breakfast, the sauce is a rich onion stock infused with fried pancetta.

Laverbread tortellini with a rich onion and bacon stock.
Serves 4 as a starter.

For the pasta

500g ’00’ pasta flour
5 large eggs

For the filling

1 Shallot finely chopped
large knob of butter
250g Cooked laverbread (simmered for several hours). Finely chopped
1 slice of brown toast, chopped
50ml Double cream

For the stock

3 Red onions sliced
1 sprig of Thyme
3 slices of Pancetta finely chopped. Plus 3 slices finely chopped for garnish.
400ml water

Method

First make the pasta. Put the flour into a bowl, make a well in the middle and crack in the eggs. Mix well until the dough comes together. Take out of the bowl and knead well (10 mins) until smooth and elastic. Wrap in clingfilm and refrigerate while you make the filling.

To make filling, melt the butter in a pan over a medium heat, add the shallot and cook gently until translucent but not brown. Put the toast, laver and cream into a food processor, add the fried shallot and any melted butter and pulse until smooth. If the mix looks dry, stir in an extra bit of cream  so that the filling is moist. put into a bowl and chill until needed.

Now make the stock.  Place a pan over a medium heat and pour in a glug of olive oil. Once hot, add the onions, Thyme and half the pancetta then cook gently until the onions are a deeply caramelised and brown.

Add the water cover the pan with a lid and simmer for 30 minutes. Now check the seasoning and taste. You want a rich onion flavour and if it is not intense enough cook out a little more.  Once you are happy with the taste pour through a sieve into a clean pan and reserve.

Take the pasta dough out of the fridge and roll it out very thinly, preferably with a pasta machine, but if not, as thin as you can with a rolling pin.

Cut the pasta into twenty 10cm squares and put a heaped teaspoon of filling in the centre of a square. Dip your finger in a little water and run it along two edges of a square. Fold the square into a triangle, pressing the top together and then working your way along the sides.
Pinch the bottom two corners of the triangle together to form a kerchief shape (see main picture). Press tightly to seal. Toss with flour, set aside on well-floured baking sheet, and cover. Repeat with remaining pasta squares.

To serve

Fry off the remaining pancetta pieces until brown and crispy.  Warm the stock through over a low heat.

Cook the tortellini in a large pan of boiling for  2-3  minutes until they float at the top of the pan, then drain.

Divide the stock between 4 warm bowls, add the tortellini and sprinkle over the crispy pancetta and if you like some chive flowers.

Serve.

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Laver Porphyra sp.

Found at the upper end of the tidal zone, fixed to rocks in sheets. Harvest with scissors to allow the seaweed to regrow. By pulling the seaweed you may also pull off tiny bits of rock that will get into you cooked dishes!

laver1

 

Wild food cookery course

We have had many requests for an ‘in depth’ wild food cookery course, so here it is!

We have designed this day to give you real taste of seasonal wild ingredients and during the day Chris will teach you, as if in your own kitchen, how to cook great dishes that will bring new  flavours to your table.

The venue for the course is The Yorkshire Wolds cookery school, near Driffield, which gives us all the facilities we need for a fabulous day of cooking and eating.

The use of the cookery school allows us to explore some more refined recipes that we would find hard to do over an open fire in the woods. Chris has created dishes that make the most of autumn’s bounty and also teach you some great core cookery skills like game preparation, curing and preserving as well as the processing of interesting wild ingredients like Burdock and acorns.

cured venison

The day will be a mixture of demonstrations from Chris and plenty of hands on cooking sessions in the schools beautiful teaching kitchen.  Lunch will be cooked as part of the course and you will also take away a goody bag and a comprehensive set of recipes for all the dishes.

Planned menu

A terrine of rabbit, black pudding and cobnut with apple and hawthorn.

Cured venison loin, elderberry ketchup, pickled berries and smoked oil.

Roast partridge, hogweed spiced squash, and burdock chips

Acorn panna cotta

Skills covered on the day

Jointing a rabbit.
Terrine making.
Simple curing.
Ketchup making.
Preparing and roasting game birds.
Preparing and cooking with burdock.
Preparing and processing acorns.
Making panna cotta.

To book the course go to our main website here www.tastethewild.co.uk/courses-extracourses.html 

Accommodation is available at the Yorkshire Wolds cookery school and this can be booked directly with Highfield farm. http://highfieldfarm.co.uk/bed-breakfast .

Wild garlic vichyssoise, Parmesan cream and Wild garlic oil

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We are making the must of the wild garlic and the warm weather.

A cool soup for a warm day!

Wild garlic vichyssoise, Parmesan cream and Wild garlic oil

For the soup.   Serves 4 as a starter.

Ingredients:

3 Tablespoons butter
6 Leeks white parts only finely chopped
2 Medium sized floury potatoes chopped into small cubes
16 Wild garlic leaves finely chopped
230ml Double cream
230ml Vegetable stock

Method:

In a large, heavy bottom pan, melt the butter over medium heat. Once butter is melted, add the leeks and cook gently for 5 minutes, making sure they are soft but do not take on any color. Add potatoes and wild garlic.  Cook for a minute or two, stirring a few times. Add the stock and bring to the boil, reduce the heat and simmer for about 30 mins, or until the potatoes are very soft. Puree the soup and then pass it through a sieve to make it super smooth.

Return to a pan and stir in the cream. Season with salt and pepper, bring to a simmer and cook for 5 mins. Take off the heat and cool, then chill.

Serve cold with parmesan cream (see below), Wild garlic oil (see below) and a scattering of Wild garlic flowers.

Parmesan Cream.   Makes more than you need for this recipe but you can store it in the fridge for a few days and use it with pasta sauces etc.

200ml double cream
Parmesan rinds, about 10 cm square in total.
These are just what you have left over after you have grated all the cheese.  I never want to throw them out but never do much with them. This proves they were worth saving!!

Put the cream and cheese into a small saucepan and simmer until thick. Remove the cheese pieces and season the cream with salt to taste.

Wild garlic oil.   Makes more than you need for this recipe but will store in the fridge for up to 2 weeks.

100ml Olive oil
10 wild garlic leaves finely chopped

Blend oil and garlic together, allow to sit for 30 minutes and then pass through a sieve.

 

 

 

Courses in Aquaponics

Picture1.pngAlthough the Wild Food Aquagarden will produce delicious food for us to supply to local people and businesses, we are setting it up so that we can use it as a teaching facility as well. We want to teach about Aquaponic growing, we have been inspired by what we’ve learnt and want to spread the word. Our core business has always been teaching, our customers are intelligent, environmentally aware people who love nature, food and doing things …

People say “what can we do now… we’ve done foraging, coastal, fungi, what else can we do?”

Well join us in The Wild Food Aquagarden!

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/994301377/the-wild-food-aquagarden

We have set up a small Aquagarden at home in our kitchen and this has taught is lot, when we have set up the Wild Food Aquagarden we will  run courses to teach at a day course level. Advanced courses will be run by The Aquaponics lab at our site and hosted by us. We want to inspire people and teach them how to set up their own Aquaponic garden. Whether it’s in a garage or a basement, or it’s a large enterprise or a little fish tank, the principle is the same.Picture7

The day course in Aquaponic growing will explain how the system works and how to set it up, where the components can be purchased, how the monitoring works, when and what to plant and how to keep your fish happy and healthy. This kind of gardening is easy and clean once the system set up, it’s undercover so there’s no wind and rain, and no bending down because the grow beds are at waist height. On the course we will look at possible problems that people could encounter and how to sort them out.

Aquaponic gardening can produce delicious food in a small space using very little power, whether you’re growing wild or cultivated plants. We think it is time the world looked at food production and the environment together, hopefully with your support we can do our little bit. Please have a look at the rewards and see if there is a way you can join with us to create our goal. Thank you.Picture2

 

 

 

What we believe… and why

deer montageTaste the Wild courses focus on three different issues: sustainability, seasonality and locality. The core of our business is teaching people about wild food foraging. Our courses are run often from the same locations and so we collect wild edible plants from these same places throughout the season. As we teach and forage from these wild places year after year we teach people to look after the environment. We want them to understand the ecosystem that relies on the plants from which we are harvesting and only collect a proportion of what is there.brimstone montageSustainable foraging is what we teach and what we passionately believe in. Our Wild Food Aquagarden would be the ultimate way to supply larger quantities of wild salads and herbs, but it would never replace the joy of collecting a few wild treats from nature’s larder. If you agree with our philosophy have a look at our new project The Wild Food Aquagarden and see if you can support us.https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/994301377/the-wild-food-aquagarden

I just walked along the river bank before writing this and saw Hogweed buds starting to form, excellent Ground Elder growing and Common Sorrel that was 12cm long! I love to keep in touch with the plants and the land, things change almost daily at this time of year and it feeds my soul.dandylion montageBesides teaching we also manage Taste the Wild’s eighteen acres of woodland for biodiversity, creating a range of habitats and managing them for both animal and plant life. The woods have become a haven for wildlife such as Buzzards, woodpeckers and deer in an area of predominantly intensive arable farming. We have an area of young conifer species which we are gradually thinning to help the natural regeneration of Birches, willows and oaks. We have created ponds and glades for insects and amphibians and along the rides we are planting smaller native broadleaf species for nuts, berries and fruit. These species give wild food to the birds, insects and mammals of the wood as well as us. We have a growing diversity of flora and fauna as shown by our species list which gets longer every year. Our facilities are basic to keep our carbon foot print as small as possible: cooking is on a wood fire (wood produced from our trees), we have composting toilets and our waste water is filtered through lava stones and sand.http://www.tastethewild.co.uk/community.html

 

Dandelion Bhajis and Wild Garlic Raita

dandelion flowers.JPGWe have been making these lovely Bhajis for years, we have even been on Countryfile demonstrating how to do it, but the video is lost and so I am giving the recipe out on the Blog for you to try. It only takes 10 minutes to make these scrumptious golden bhajis, you can serve them with plain yoghurt or maybe a Raita made with Wild Garlic..

Dandelion flowers open with the sun and close up overnight or when it rains. On sunny April days it’s often easy to find lots of lovely open flowers and these are the ones to collect.

Dandelion Bhajis and Wild Garlic Raita

You will need a deep pan to hold the frying oil and a thermometer to keep a check on the oil temperature.

Dandelion Bhajis – makes approx 15

  • 200g gram flour
  • ¼ tsp Bicarbonate of soda
  • A pinch of salt
  • ½ tsp chilli powder
  • 1 tsp Cumin seeds
  • 45 large dandelion flower heads
  • 1.5 litres sunflower oil for deep frying

Put all the dry ingredients except the dandelions in a bowl and mix. Stir in approximately 100ml of cold water to make a thick batter, now put the dandelions into the batter and mix well to coat.Dandelion bhajis

Heat your deep frying oil to 185 degrees C and then gently drop spoonfuls (about 3 flowers) of the batter covered flowers into the oil. Deep fry for 2-3 minutes until golden, remove from the oil, drain on kitchen paper and serve seasoned with salt.5 Dandelion BhajisWild Garlic Raita

  • 400ml soured cream/crème fraiche
  • 1 bunch wild garlic washed and chopped
  • 5cm piece of cucumber chopped very small
  • Salt and pepper

Mix all the ingredients together and season to taste.

 

 

Growing Wild Food Aquaponically

montage for email2Hi Everybody,

Chris and I are excited to share our new plan with you all. We have a project that we hope will inspire you.

Wild Food is so popular now that we would like grow some of these ingredients sustainably and supply local businesses. We have found a way of growing that makes complete sense. – It uses Aquaponics. perch and plantsWe’re going to use UK river fish (Perch) …so no need to heat the water! And grow off grid in a polytunnel, on our land in Yorkshire. We are so inspired by this compact, energy efficient way of growing that we will teach as well when we are up and running.sun rain polytunnel In the meantime, if we get the funding, the technical development of the Off Grid system and the information on growing shade tolerant plants will be freely available to everyone online. This could possibly help with growing projects in urban situations with limited power supply and in remote places where the sun doesn’t always shine. We have technical support from the amazing guys at the Aquaponics Lab in Manchester.rewards montage

Our Kickstarter campaign for ‘The Wild Food Aquagarden’ has gone live! Hope you can spare a minute to have a look through it. We have all sorts of rewards for backers from small gifts to party invites etc etc.

Hope you’re interested, please share this with anybody else you think might be too.

Thanks and kind Regards Rose and Chris

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/994301377/the-wild-food-aquagarden