Marigold Marmalade

marigold marmalade

Golden petals and apple juice add sunshine to your breakfast.

I know they grow wild in Southern Europe not North Yorkshire, but we love them and this experimental preserve is so nice we decided to share the recipe with you all.

Marigold soothes the stomach, it is said to reduce stomach lining inflammation in gastritis and ulcer sufferers and soothe the intestine too”

Marigold Marmalade – makes 3 jars

  • 80 grams Marigold flower petals
  • 1 litre cloudy, natural apple juice (not from concentrate)
  • 100ml freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 750g Jam sugar (sugar with pectin added)

Put 60g of petals in to a pan with the apple juice and heat to simmering point. Remove from the heat and leave to infuse overnight.

Now strain out the petals and return the apple juice to the pan. Add the lemon juice and heat slowly to boiling point. Now add the sugar and stir to dissolve, add the last 20g of Marigold petals and turn up the heat.

(Put your clean jars and lids in the oven at 100 degrees C to sterilise)
Boil hard until the temperature reaches 105 C and setting point is reached. (approx. 10mins) To test for a set put a little marmalade on to a cold plate, wait for a minute then push your finger tip through it. If setting point has been reached the top will wrinkle and the marmalade will be like jelly.
When setting point is reached turn off the heat and skim off any bubbly scum from the surface. Cool for a few minutes until the marmalade has thickened a little and the petals are not floating to the surface. Now pour in to the sterilised jars and put the lids on when cool enough to handle.

Calendula Officinalis

Calendula Officinalis

 

 

Our One Day Summer Wine Making Course is a treat for those who like learning, tasting and making things.

Elderflower and Rose champagneWe meet at 9.45am at our local vineyard in time for a quick drink before a private tour at 10.00am. We learn how different grape varieties are grown and matured here in Yorkshire to create award winning English wines. The winery building its self is where the wines are produced from grapes to glass, we can see the equipment used to create the wines. Our excellent guides, owners Chris and Gillian Spakouskas, will explain the processes and techniques used to produce a great quality product and give us a tasting of Sparkling White, Latimer White and Latimer Red Wines.

We have a half hour drive back to our own wood during which we will stop to collect some wild flowers and blossoms. Lunch will be a picnic. back at the barn Rose will show you how to make reliably great Elderflower Wine on a small scale in your own kitchen. You’ll learn about different types of wine making equipment and the science of fermentation. The importance of acidity and tannins and lots of helpful tips. There will be tastings of different country wines and everybody will start off their own 5 litres of wild flower champagne. The afternoon will end with a session on flavoured spirits where Rose will explain how to make some amazing liqueurs and how to blend and balance flavours. We will taste liqueurs that use spring wild plants as flavouring and then you can make your own wild spirit to take home. Along with the spirit you will take home a 5 litre fermenter full of flower champagne, and a sheet of recipes.

The course starts at 9.45am and finishes at 4pm. The course starts at Yorkshire Heart Vineyard, Pool Lane, Nun Monkton, York YO26 8EL and finishes at Taste the wild’s woodland kitchen. (Nr Boroughbridge, North Yorkshire) directions to the wood will be sent with course booking confirmation. A light lunch and drinks are provided, please wear suitable outdoor clothing.

The cost of the course includes:-

  •        all tuition
  •        lunch
  •        wine and liqueur tastings
  •       5L wild flower ‘Champagne’
  •        250ml wild flavoured liqueur
  •        Recipe sheets

£95.00 per person   Click here for dates and to book

 

Wild mushroom tart, a surprise dinner.

I ran a private fungi course in a friends wood on Sunday and we had a fantastic morning exploring the wide range of mushrooms growing there. As well as the biggest group of the deadly Death cap (amanita phalloides) I have ever seen, we also had huge array of delicious edible varieties.

  • Pied de mouton
  • Brown birch bolete
  • Bay bolete
  • Bulbous honey fungus
  • Ochre brittlegill
  • Deer shield
  • Purple brittlegill
  • Shaggy inkcap
  • The flirt
  • Amethyst deciever
  • The deciever

We returned with our laden basket only for me to find out that everyone on the course was heading to L’enclume for dinner and couldn’t take any of the mushrooms home with them.

All for me! What a treat!  But what to cook?

With beautiful mushrooms and not a lot of time on my hands decided on this tasty puff pastry tart, and it went down a treat.

img_9883-2

Easy Mushroom tart

Ingredientsimg_9877
85 g Breadcrumbs
100g Cheddar finely grated
zest of 1 lemon
1 tsp fresh Thyme leaves
2 cloves Garlic minced
200g Mixed mushrooms sliced
150g Puff pastry  (bought or homemade)
a little milk for glazing
Salt and pepper
Olive oil

Method

Put a large saucepan over a high heat and add a large glug of olive oil. Fry the mushrooms at a high heat, if you only have a small pan then do it in batches so you can evaporate the any moisture quickly and get a little caramelisation on the mushrooms. Remove from the pan and set aside to cool. Whilst the mushrooms are cooling, roll out the pastry  to an oblong shape about 3mm thick.  Put the pastry onto a greased baking sheet, take a small knife and score a line around the pastry sheet 2cm from the edge.

Add the breadcrumbs, garlic and thyme to the cooled mushrooms and mix well.  Season the mixture with salt and black pepper then pile it onto the centre of the pastry base, keeping inside your scored line.  Sprinkle the cheese on top, glaze the pastry edges with milk and bake in the centre of the oven at 170 degrees C for 20-25 minutes until the pastry is golden and cooked through.

I served this hot with a winter vegetable slaw, but it would be great cold too.

Fruits Of Their Labour: Husthwaite’s Cider Rennaissance

Orchards of Husthwaite

We have 5 Places left on our Cider Making day course, (12th October) this blog is about the cider mill that we visit on the day.  Back at our barn you will learn how to make delicious cider at home and at the end of the day take away 5litres of apple juice in a fermenter all ready to go. To find out more or to book a place check out the extra courses page on our website.

A nicely written piece about an excellent project.

DAVE LEE

How the residents of a Yorkshire village used cider to return to their roots.

View original post 1,081 more words

Crab apple Brandy

crab apple brandy to drink

The finished product, ready to drink!

Not just for jelly!
Deliciously tart Crab apples turn a very average bottle of brandy into a luxury tipple.

Ingredients:

1 x 70cl bottle of brandy
500g crab apples
Juice of half a lemon
50g sugar

Method:

Wash the crab apples, remove the stalks and cut them into halves. Put them into a large bottle or jar with a well fitting lid. Add the brandy, lemon juice and sugar. Swirl the ingredients around to dissolve the sugar and leave in a dark place for a month. Once a week give the brandy a gentle swish round to help extract the flavour from the fruit. After a month taste it to check for flavour and sweetness.

crab apple brandy just started

The flavour of the crab apple brandy will vary from year to year as the fruit varies. You can easily sweeten the liqueur by stirring in some caster sugar. Likewise if there is not enough apple flavour add some extra apple and leave for another week or two. When you are ready to bottle the brandy remove the fruit and strain through a very fine mesh sieve or muslin. The crab apple brandy will improve with keeping, – ideally store for a year before drinking.

Cider making course

cider 1

If you have ever fancied making cider at home but were never sure where to start, we have created an October day course which gives you a fun day of learning, 5 litres of apple juice in a fermenter, yeast and the skills to turn it in to cider!

Our one day cider making course is a day of emersion in to the world of cider: chopping, pressing, brewing and bottling. Date Weds 12th October 2016

We visit the local cider making cooperative and learn how different types of apples are used to create a good flavour balance and see the techniques used to produce a great quality product. The apple chopping machine and press will be in action and we can help in the apple juicing. Our guide Cameron Smith has a wealth of knowledge and experience. He will explain processes and techniques with us and we will be able to see how the village community produces enough cider to fund lots of local projects.

We have lunch back at the barn in our wood and taste some local ciders. The afternoon is spent with passionate homebrewer Steve, he will show you how to make reliably great cider on a small scale in your own kitchen. You’ll learn about different types of cider making equipment from the very basic household items to more purpose made devices — and have a go at using it. Steve will share his tips and techniques to make successful cider and give everyone a step by step guide. Along with the guide you will take home a 5 litre fermenter full of apple juice an airlock and yeast…all ready to turn into cider

The course starts at 10.00am and finishes at 4pm. The course will run in Taste the wild’s woodland kitchen. (Nr Boroughbridge, North Yorkshire) directions will be sent with course booking confirmation. We will have a 15 minute drive to our local cider makers in the morning.

To book visit our website here www.tastethewild.co.uk/courses-extracourses.html

The cost of the course (£95.00) includes:-

  • all tuition
  • lunch
  • cider tastings
  • 5L apple juice
  • a fermenter
  • an airlock
  • yeast

Making natural skin and hair care products

We have spent a lot of years looking in to the culinary uses of wild plants and along the way have discovered that they also have some fantastic therapeutic benefits. Many of our everyday wild plants have amazing ways to help our skin and hair.

hair and skin care

Rose has designed a great new course to teach about some of these exciting plant uses. Come along and learn to make natural skin and hair products at home, for yourself and for others!

The beauty of this course is that you can choose the wild ingredients that are perfect for your own hair and skin. For example some strengthen hair, some encourage it to grow, there are plants for reducing wrinkles and some that help with eczema.

Course itinerary

  • Introduction to the benefits of using wild plants in skin and hair care.
  • Demonstration on making infused oils
  • Hands-on session making shampoo for your own hair type.
  • Demo, then everyone makes a bath bomb
  • All make bath salts
  • Tea, coffee and biscuits
  • Demonstration on making lip balm
  • Hands on session making lip balm and herb salve
  • Talk about emulsifying and demonstration of making cream
  • Q & A

Herbal hair and skin care is extremely personal and this course gives you the chance to make products for your own needs. You will receive hands-on experience in making, natural skin and hair care products along with an introduction to the raw materials used. No previous knowledge or experience needed.

The course runs from 10.00am until 1.00pm on Tuesday 22nd November, at Pilmoor Grange, close to our wood in North Yorkshire. We will be in a beautiful stone and oak barn and there will be heaters but it would be advisable to wear warm clothes and comfortable shoes and to bring an apron. Course materials, herbal plant guide sheets and recipe sheets are provided for each student as well as tea, coffee and biscuits. Full directions are given when you book. Places are limited to 8 people.  £60.00 per person.

Of course you’ll take home all of the products that you make:

  • Herbal shampoo
  • Bath bomb
  • Bath salts
  • Lip balm
  • Herbal salve

To book visit our website here www.tastethewild.co.uk/courses-extracourses.html