New! Healthy eating Wild food course at Taste the wild.

hanna

We are very excited to be teaming up with healthy eating author Hanna Sillitoe to run an inspirational course showing how to include Taste the wild’s favourite wild foods in super healthy ‘Free from’ recipes.

Hanna is the food blogger behind the website www.mygoodnessrecipes.com which gained a worldwide following when she began sharing her journey to health on her blog, as well as Instagram and Twitter.  She has recently published her first book ‘Radiant-Recipes to heal your skin from within

‘Very inspiring, informative and helpful with nutritious, easy-to-follow recipes to make you beam from the inside out.’ Lucy Bee

All the recipes on this course will be free from gluten, sugar, dairy and meat.

Think ‘Chia seed hedgerow berry jam’ ,‘Wild herb Chickpea bread’ and Vegan pesto.

During the day there will be foraging trips with Chris and Rose from Taste the wild as well as cookery demonstrations and nutrition advice from Hanna. Some of the cooking sessions will be ‘hands on’ so you can all get involved.

Come and join us for a day of healthy eating in the wild!

This course will open your eyes to world of exciting ingredients bringing delicious new healthy dishes to your repertoire. The course is held in the barn in our wood please dress for the outdoors and bring an apron.

Course Information

£135 per person  Click here to book

9.30am – 4.00pm

Nettle Beer

This year we have developed a new recipe and it beats all the other Nettle Beer recipes we have tried. It is important to pick good quality Stinging Nettles Urtica Dioca just 5cm tips and none with flowers (look like little catkins). They are starting to flower now in June, so look for those in shady places where they are a little behind.

nettle beer 'Taste the Wild'

Nettle Beer

  • 225g fresh nettle tops
  • 2L plastic bottle of spring water
  • 100g dark muscovado sugar
  • Juice of 1 lemon – strained
  • 5g white wine yeast

Day 1  Put the water and nettle tops in a large pan and bring to the boil, cover and simmer for 20 minutes. Save the bottle for later. Put the sugar in to a large bowl or fermenting bucket, then strain the nettle liquid, through a sieve lined with muslin, in to the bowl. When the nettles are cool enough gather up the corners of the muslin and squeeze to extract as much liquid as possible. Stir to dissolve the sugar and leave to cool. When the liquid is at room temperature (approx. 17-21 degrees C) add the lemon juice and stir, then sprinkle the yeast on to the surface. Cover the bowl or bucket with a clean tea towel and keep it out of direct sunlight but at room temperature for 3 days.

Day 4   Now using a funnel lined with clean muslin transfer the nettle beer in to the 2litre plastic bottle that had the water in, leave 3cm of space in the top of the bottle before screwing the cap on tightly. Store in a dark cupboard for 1 week burping the bottle daily,

Day 11  Transfer the bottle to the fridge and store for a week.

Day 18  Woo Hoo it’s ready. You can drink it straight away or save it for up to 6 months. We like it with a splash of lemonade. Don’t worry if the beer is a bit cloudy but pour carefully so that any sediment remains at the bottom of the bottle.

Marigold Marmalade

marigold marmalade

Golden petals and apple juice add sunshine to your breakfast.

I know they grow wild in Southern Europe not North Yorkshire, but we love them and this experimental preserve is so nice we decided to share the recipe with you all.

Marigold soothes the stomach, it is said to reduce stomach lining inflammation in gastritis and ulcer sufferers and soothe the intestine too”

Marigold Marmalade – makes 3 jars

  • 80 grams Marigold flower petals
  • 1 litre cloudy, natural apple juice (not from concentrate)
  • 100ml freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 750g Jam sugar (sugar with pectin added)

Put 60g of petals in to a pan with the apple juice and heat to simmering point. Remove from the heat and leave to infuse overnight.

Now strain out the petals and return the apple juice to the pan. Add the lemon juice and heat slowly to boiling point. Now add the sugar and stir to dissolve, add the last 20g of Marigold petals and turn up the heat.

(Put your clean jars and lids in the oven at 100 degrees C to sterilise)
Boil hard until the temperature reaches 105 C and setting point is reached. (approx. 10mins) To test for a set put a little marmalade on to a cold plate, wait for a minute then push your finger tip through it. If setting point has been reached the top will wrinkle and the marmalade will be like jelly.
When setting point is reached turn off the heat and skim off any bubbly scum from the surface. Cool for a few minutes until the marmalade has thickened a little and the petals are not floating to the surface. Now pour in to the sterilised jars and put the lids on when cool enough to handle.

Calendula Officinalis

Calendula Officinalis

 

 

Our One Day Summer Wine Making Course is a treat for those who like learning, tasting and making things.

Elderflower and Rose champagneWe meet at 9.45am at our local vineyard in time for a quick drink before a private tour at 10.00am. We learn how different grape varieties are grown and matured here in Yorkshire to create award winning English wines. The winery building its self is where the wines are produced from grapes to glass, we can see the equipment used to create the wines. Our excellent guides, owners Chris and Gillian Spakouskas, will explain the processes and techniques used to produce a great quality product and give us a tasting of Sparkling White, Latimer White and Latimer Red Wines.

We have a half hour drive back to our own wood during which we will stop to collect some wild flowers and blossoms. Lunch will be a picnic. back at the barn Rose will show you how to make reliably great Elderflower Wine on a small scale in your own kitchen. You’ll learn about different types of wine making equipment and the science of fermentation. The importance of acidity and tannins and lots of helpful tips. There will be tastings of different country wines and everybody will start off their own 5 litres of wild flower champagne. The afternoon will end with a session on flavoured spirits where Rose will explain how to make some amazing liqueurs and how to blend and balance flavours. We will taste liqueurs that use spring wild plants as flavouring and then you can make your own wild spirit to take home. Along with the spirit you will take home a 5 litre fermenter full of flower champagne, and a sheet of recipes.

The course starts at 9.45am and finishes at 4pm. The course starts at Yorkshire Heart Vineyard, Pool Lane, Nun Monkton, York YO26 8EL and finishes at Taste the wild’s woodland kitchen. (Nr Boroughbridge, North Yorkshire) directions to the wood will be sent with course booking confirmation. A light lunch and drinks are provided, please wear suitable outdoor clothing.

The cost of the course includes:-

  •        all tuition
  •        lunch
  •        wine and liqueur tastings
  •       5L wild flower ‘Champagne’
  •        250ml wild flavoured liqueur
  •        Recipe sheets

£95.00 per person   Click here for dates and to book

 

Wild mushroom tart, a surprise dinner.

I ran a private fungi course in a friends wood on Sunday and we had a fantastic morning exploring the wide range of mushrooms growing there. As well as the biggest group of the deadly Death cap (amanita phalloides) I have ever seen, we also had huge array of delicious edible varieties.

  • Pied de mouton
  • Brown birch bolete
  • Bay bolete
  • Bulbous honey fungus
  • Ochre brittlegill
  • Deer shield
  • Purple brittlegill
  • Shaggy inkcap
  • The flirt
  • Amethyst deciever
  • The deciever

We returned with our laden basket only for me to find out that everyone on the course was heading to L’enclume for dinner and couldn’t take any of the mushrooms home with them.

All for me! What a treat!  But what to cook?

With beautiful mushrooms and not a lot of time on my hands decided on this tasty puff pastry tart, and it went down a treat.

img_9883-2

Easy Mushroom tart

Ingredientsimg_9877
85 g Breadcrumbs
100g Cheddar finely grated
zest of 1 lemon
1 tsp fresh Thyme leaves
2 cloves Garlic minced
200g Mixed mushrooms sliced
150g Puff pastry  (bought or homemade)
a little milk for glazing
Salt and pepper
Olive oil

Method

Put a large saucepan over a high heat and add a large glug of olive oil. Fry the mushrooms at a high heat, if you only have a small pan then do it in batches so you can evaporate the any moisture quickly and get a little caramelisation on the mushrooms. Remove from the pan and set aside to cool. Whilst the mushrooms are cooling, roll out the pastry  to an oblong shape about 3mm thick.  Put the pastry onto a greased baking sheet, take a small knife and score a line around the pastry sheet 2cm from the edge.

Add the breadcrumbs, garlic and thyme to the cooled mushrooms and mix well.  Season the mixture with salt and black pepper then pile it onto the centre of the pastry base, keeping inside your scored line.  Sprinkle the cheese on top, glaze the pastry edges with milk and bake in the centre of the oven at 170 degrees C for 20-25 minutes until the pastry is golden and cooked through.

I served this hot with a winter vegetable slaw, but it would be great cold too.

Fruits Of Their Labour: Husthwaite’s Cider Rennaissance

Orchards of Husthwaite

We have 5 Places left on our Cider Making day course, (12th October) this blog is about the cider mill that we visit on the day.  Back at our barn you will learn how to make delicious cider at home and at the end of the day take away 5litres of apple juice in a fermenter all ready to go. To find out more or to book a place check out the extra courses page on our website.

A nicely written piece about an excellent project.

DAVE LEE

How the residents of a Yorkshire village used cider to return to their roots.

View original post 1,081 more words

Crab apple Brandy

crab apple brandy to drink

The finished product, ready to drink!

Not just for jelly!
Deliciously tart Crab apples turn a very average bottle of brandy into a luxury tipple.

Ingredients:

1 x 70cl bottle of brandy
500g crab apples
Juice of half a lemon
50g sugar

Method:

Wash the crab apples, remove the stalks and cut them into halves. Put them into a large bottle or jar with a well fitting lid. Add the brandy, lemon juice and sugar. Swirl the ingredients around to dissolve the sugar and leave in a dark place for a month. Once a week give the brandy a gentle swish round to help extract the flavour from the fruit. After a month taste it to check for flavour and sweetness.

crab apple brandy just started

The flavour of the crab apple brandy will vary from year to year as the fruit varies. You can easily sweeten the liqueur by stirring in some caster sugar. Likewise if there is not enough apple flavour add some extra apple and leave for another week or two. When you are ready to bottle the brandy remove the fruit and strain through a very fine mesh sieve or muslin. The crab apple brandy will improve with keeping, – ideally store for a year before drinking.